Ellen Sturgis Hooper (February 17, 1812 – November 3, 1848) was an American poet. A member of the Transcendental Club, she was widely regarded as one of the most gifted poets among the New England Transcendentalists. Her work is occasionally reprinted in anthologies.

She was, besides, an acquaintance of William Ellery Channing, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry James, Sr..

Ellen Sturgis was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of William F. Sturgis and Elizabeth M. Davis. Her father was a wealthy Boston merchant.

Her poetry was regularly commissioned by Ralph Waldo Emerson and published in The Dial. Her poems also appeared in Elizabeth Peabody's Æsthetic Papers (1849), and the final stanzas of one of her poems, The Wood-Fire, appear in Henry David Thoreau's novel, Walden (1854).

She married Robert W. Hooper, and the couple had three children, one of whom, Marian "Clover" Hooper, married Henry Adams and became a celebrated Washington, D.C., hostess and photographer.

Ellen Sturgis Hooper's early death in Boston, at age 36, is said to have "enshrined her in the memories of her associates as a Transcendental angel."

Poems by Ellen Sturgis Hooper

Poet of the day

Edward George Dyson was an Australian poet, journalist and short story writer.

He was born at Morrisons near Ballarat in March 1865. His father, George Dyson, arrived in Australia in 1852 and after working on various diggings became a mining engineer, his mother came from a life of refinement in...
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Poem of the day


J'aime ton nom d'Apollonie,
Echo grec du sacré vallon,
Qui, dans sa robuste harmonie,
Te baptise soeur d'Apollon.

Sur la lyre au plectre d'ivoire,
Ce nom splendide et souverain,
Beau comme l'amour et la gloire,
Prend des résonances d'airain.

Classique, il fait plonger les...
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