YOUTH, thou art fled, - but where are all the charms
Which, though with thee they came, and passed with thee,
Should leave a perfume and sweet memory
Of what they have been? All thy boons and harms
Have perished quite. Thy oft-revered alarms
Forsake the fluttering echo. Smiles and tears
Die on my cheek, or, petrified with years,
Show the dull woe which no compassion warms,
The mirth none shares. Yet could a wish, a thought,
Unravel all the complex web of age, -
Could all the characters that Time hath wrought
Be clean effaced from my memorial page
By one short word, the word I would not say; -
I thank my God because my hairs are gray.


About Hartley Coleridge


Hartley Coleridge (19 September 1796 – 6 January 1849) was an English writer. He was the eldest son of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He was born in Kingsdown, a suburb of Bristol, and spent his early years in the care of Robert Southey at Greta Hall, Keswick, and he was educated by the Rev. John Dawes at Ambleside. In 1815, he went to Oxford, as a scholar of Merton College. He had inherited much of his father's character, and his lifestyle was such that, although he was successful in gaining an Oriel fellowship, at the close of the probationary... Read more...

Poet of the day

Waris Shah (Punjabi: وارث شاہ, ਵਾਰਿਸ ਸ਼ਾਹ) was a Punjabi Sufi poet, renowned for his contribution to Punjabi literature. He is best known for his seminal work Heer Ranjha, based on the traditional folk tale of Heer and her lover Ranjha. Heer is considered one of the quintessential works of...
Read more...

Poem of the day


Ære og Priis og Dyd!
Vi med Fryd
Os barnlig paa Gud-Fader
Forlader:
Vi var i Nød saa længe,
Dog hørde Han vor Bøn,
Og alt, hvortil vi trænge,
Han gav os med sin Søn!
Thi ville vi nu sjunge
Med...
Read more...