This is the phrase they love to say:
'Just like a man!'
You can hear it wherever you chance to stray:
'Just like a man!'
The wife of the toiler, the queen of the king,
The bride with the shiny new wedding-ring
And the grandmothers, too, at our sex will fling,
'Just like a man!'
Cranky and peevish at times we grow:
'Just like a man!'
Now and then boastful of what we know:
'Just like a man!'
Whatever our failings from day to day—
Stingy, or giving our goods away—
With a toss of her head, she is sure to say,
'Just like a man!'
Unannounced strangers we bring to tea:
'Just like a man!'
Heedless of every propriety:
'Just like a man!'
Grumbling at money she spends for spats
And filmy dresses and gloves and hats,
Yet wanting her stylishly garbed, and that's
'Just like a man!'
Wanting attention from year to year:
'Just like a man!'
Seemingly helpless when she's not near:
'Just like a man!'
Troublesome often, and quick to demur,
Still remaining the boys we were,
Yet soothed and blest by the love of her:
'Just like a man!'


About Edgar Albert Guest


Edgar Allen Guest also known as Eddie Guest was a prolific English-born American poet who was popular in the first half of the 20th century and became known as the People's Poet. Eddie Guest was born in Birmingham, England in 1881, moving to Michigan USA as a young child, it was here he was educated. In 1895, the year before Henry Ford took his first ride in a motor carriage, Eddie Guest signed on with the Free Press as a 13-year-old office boy. He stayed for 60 years. In those six decades, Detroit underwent half a dozen identity changes, but... Read more...

Poet of the day

Son of Thomas Godfrey (1704–1749), a Philadelphia glazier and member of Benjamin Franklin’s Junto Club, Godfrey produced some significant work in his short life.
Well known in literary circles in Philadelphia, he was a close friend of the poet Nathaniel Evans and the college provost William Smith. In 1758...
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Poem of the day


First winter rain--
even the monkey
seems to want a raincoat.

Translated by Robert Hass


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